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Old 07-12-2017, 09:27 PM
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Donegal soldier's Victoria Cross goes on display
The only Victoria Cross to be awarded to a Donegal man will go on public display in the county for the first time this afternoon.

Private James Duffy, a stretcher bearer, was awarded the medal for "most conspicuous bravery" after he saved the lives of two of his comrades in Palestine in December 1917.

The VC was presented to him by King George V in July 1918 at Buckingham Palace.

Pte Duffy served with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and his medal was donated to the regimental museum in Enniskillen.

A security operation involving gardaí and members of the Defence Forces will surround its transportation from Fermanagh to Letterkenny where it will go on display at Donegal County Museum from 2pm to 4.30pm.

Also coming from Enniskillen are medals awarded to another Donegal soldier, Captain Henry Gallaugher, who was awarded the Distinguished Service Order.
https://www.rte.ie/news/ulster/2017/...cross-donegal/
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  #472  
Old 11-12-2017, 02:27 PM
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Donegal's Only WWI Victoria Cross on display today between 2- 4.30pm
in Donegal County Museum
Donegal County Museum, in partnership with the Inniskilling Museum and the Irish Defence Forces, are delighted to display for the first time in County Donegal, the Victoria Cross awarded to Pte James Duffy for “most conspicuous bravery” during World War I. He is the only Donegal winner of a Victoria Cross in WWI. Also on exhibition, the medals awarded to Captain Henry Gallaugher DSO. The medals are on loan from the Inniskilling Museum.
Admission is free and all are welcome.
The Museum is also hosting the exhibition ‘Ulster Winners of the Victoria Cross’ on loan from the Ulster Scots Agency and there will be an opportunity for the public to consult the draft version of the County Donegal Book of Honour: The Great War 1914-1918.
Pte James Duffy VC was born at Thorr, Crolly, Gweedore, on 17 November 1889. As a young baby he was brought to live in Bonagee, Letterkenny. He enlisted in Glasgow on the 1st December 1914 and was posted to the 6th Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. The Battalion was sent to Gallipoli, later to Egypt and onto Palestine in September 1917 as part of the British invasion of Palestine. On the 27th December 1917, Private Duffy’s heroic actions saved the lives of two of his comrades. He was presented with the Victoria Cross by King George V on 25 July 1918 at Buckingham Palace. He is the only WWI Victoria Cross recipient from County Donegal. His VC is in the collection of the Inniskilling Museum at Enniskillen Castle, Co. Fermanagh.
Captain Henry Gallaugher was born at Balleighain, Manorcunningham in 1886. He was commissioned into the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in 1914. During the Battle of the Somme, Captain Gallaugher formed a party which rescued 28 men stranded in no-man’s land and he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. On 7 June 1917 during the Battle of Messines, Capt Gallagher’s right arm was shattered by a shell fragment. Although urged to go back, he led his company to its objective, and while returning later to have his arm dressed, he was killed instantly by a shell. He is buried in Lone Tree Cemetery, Belgium.
For further information, please contact Donegal County Museum, High Road, Letterkenny, Co Donegal T 074 9124613 E museum@donegalcoco.ie
Donegal County Council Donegal County Archives Donegal Daily Donegal Now Highland Radio News and Sport John Breslin The Inniskillings Museum
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Last edited by jembo; 11-12-2017 at 09:49 PM.
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  #473  
Old 22-12-2017, 08:30 PM
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The courage of the Reverend James Adams, the first clergyman to win the Victoria Cross.

WHEN James Adams’s mother ordered him to embark on a career in the Church, he described it as the bitterest blow of his life.

Strong, sporty and with a sense of adventure, he had hoped for a commission in the army but instead he found himself heading for Trinity College Dublin to study theology.

Little did the young man know at the time that one day he would become the recipient of Britain and the Commonwealth’s most prestigious bravery award: the Victoria Cross.

I have recently completed the private purchase of Adams’s medal group to add to my collection of VCs, the largest in the world.

His is remarkable for several reasons: the Reverend Adams was the first “ecclesiastical VC” and to this day he is also the only clergyman to receive the medal who was not an army chaplain.
He was also the fifth, and to date final, “civilian VC” (my collection, in fact, has three of the civilian VCs).

Furthermore, the medal group came with a typed and bound (but unpublished) write-up on his life penned by his only daughter Edith, which provides a unique insight into his unusual life.

James William Adams was born in Cork, Ireland, on November 24, 1839.

He was the only son of Thomas Adams, a Justice of the Peace, and his wife Elizabeth. Little is known of James’s early life but he had at least one sister and was educated at Hamblin and Porter’s School in Cork.

He was also a fine horseman.

His father died when James was aged 11 and his mother refused to allow him to go to school, something that he regretted all his life.

Instead he was educated by a succession of tutors. At the time, James had only one career desire – to become a soldier – but his mother chose the church and, with a sense of early Victorian obedience, her son complied.

At Trinity College he distinguished himself at boxing and athletics but was half-hearted in his commitment to his course.

However, he passed his exams and in 1863, aged nearly 24, he was ordained as a deacon and as a priest the following year.

His first curacy was in Hyde, Hampshire, from 1863 to 1865 and then at Shottesbrooke, Berkshire, from 1865 to 1867.
While in his second post he came to the conclusion that he could not stand life in a small country parish any longer.

He successfully applied for a post as one of the chaplains in the Bengal Ecclesiastical Establishment and travelled – with a sense of relief – to India with his sister Kate.

Long after her father’s death, Edith Adams wrote: “At this time we may say that James Adams’s life began. He was entirely the right man in the right place and he loved every moment of it, and he was popular with everyone.”

Initially, Adams was based in Peshawar, then Allahabad, then Peshawar again from 1871, where he remained for the next four years.

He rode long distances on horseback to deliver sermons, and he was renowned for his strength and stamina.

Unrest in Afghanistan grew in 1877 and Adams served as extra aide-de-camp to military commander Sir Frederick Roberts, to whom he was devoted.

Roberts (later Lord Roberts and commander of the British forces during the Second Boer War) served with distinction during the Second Afghan War of 1878-80, a conflict that saw British forces invade the Emirate of Afghanistan as part of the so-called “Great Game” between Britain and Russia.

During the war Adams – despite remaining a civilian – was determined to do his bit as chaplain to the Kabul Field Force.

Read More:-
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style...-lord-ashcroft
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  #474  
Old 10-01-2018, 08:54 PM
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John Frederick McCrea was born on 2 April 1854 at St Peter Port, Guernsey to Captain Herbert Taylor McCrea and Elizabeth Dobree Carey. Following his parents' deaths in 1855, he was brought up by his aunt Charlotte in Guernsey and educated at Elizabeth College. He then studied medicine at Guy's Hospital, qualifying in 1878 as a member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and Edinburgh.

In 1879 he went to South Africa, where he did duty at the Military Hospital in Cape Town as Civilian Surgeon to Her Majesty's Forces. A year later he moved to Fort Beaufort, Eastern Cape to settle, but decided instead to join the 1st Regiment, Cape Mounted Yeomanry as a surgeon.

Details
Surgeon McCrea was 26 years old, and a Surgeon in the 1st Cape Mounted Yeomanry, South African Forces during the Transvaal War, when he performed the following actions for which he was awarded the VC.

On 14 January 1881, at Tweefontein, Basutoland, South Africa, the burghers had been forced to retire under a most determined enemy attack, with a loss of 16 killed and 21 wounded. Surgeon McCrea was the only doctor present and notwithstanding a serious wound on the breast bone, which he dressed himself, he most gallantly took the casualties into shelter and continued to attend to the wounded throughout the day. Had it not been for this devotion to duty on the part of Surgeon McCrea, there would undoubtedly have been much greater suffering and loss of life.

Further career
He was promoted to the rank of Surgeon Major and on 3 February 1882 was transferred to the Cape Mounted Riflemen.

He remained with the regiment and married a South African, Elizabeth Antoinette (Bessie) Watermeyer.He died of heart failure at his home in Kokstad, Cape Colony on 16 July 1894. His widow died on 5 November 1936 in Exmouth, Devon. She was buried in Littleham, Exmouth.

Photos of him exist in the Cape Town Military Museum and in the South African National Museum of Military History. His VC is on display in the Lord Ashcroft VC Gallery at the Imperial War Museum, London.

A painting of McCrea winning his Victoria Cross was completed by Eric Wale of Cape Town for the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC) in Millbank, United Kingdom.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Frederick_McCrea
http://jramc.bmj.com/content/157/4/411
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  #475  
Old 20-01-2018, 09:02 AM
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Acting Corporal James Patrick Scully (20 October 1909 – December 1974) of the Pioneer Corps was awarded the George Cross for the valour he displayed on 8 March 1941 in Liverpool in rescuing people from a bomb damaged building. He was originally from Crumlin, Dublin.

The citation was published in the London Gazette on 8 July 1941, and reads:

“ The KING has been graciously pleased to approve the award of the GEORGE CROSS, to:-
No. 13039555 Acting Corporal James Patrick Scully, Pioneer Corps. (Crunslin, (sic) Co. Dublin.)

When houses were demolished by enemy action, a rescue party under the direction of Lieutenant Chittenden went to the incident and a search was made for trapped people.

Corporal Scully located a man and a woman and, with great difficulty, he managed to penetrate the debris and get to where they were buried. Lieutenant Chittenden followed him. Wood was obtained to use as props to shore up the debris, but there was no means of cutting it into proper lengths.

A rescue party then arrived with tools to cut some wood into more suitable lengths for shoring. All available help was mustered and the men worked tremendously hard in their efforts to clear away the wreckage. Corporal Scully remained with the trapped persons and prevented any more debris falling on them. A long plank was inserted to take most of the weight but as the result of further falls the props began to sway out of position. There was then a very real danger of the mass of debris falling down and burying the injured persons. Realising this, Corporal Scully placed his back under the plank to try to prevent the props from giving way completely. He steadied them for a time but gradually the weight increased until the props slipped. This left Corporal Scully holding one end of the plank and Lieutenant Chittenden supporting the other. Corporal Scully could have got away at this stage, but he knew that if he did so the debris would fall and probably kill the trapped persons, so he stayed under the plank. Gradually the weight increased and forced Corporal Scully down until he lay across the trapped man. Lieutenant Chittenden who was still holding one end of the plank reached over and supported Corporal Scully's head to prevent him from being suffocated by having his head pressed into the debris. He managed to keep Corporal Scully's face clear, but he was fast becoming exhausted. Despite this, he kept up his spirits and continued to talk encouragingly to the woman. The man was unconscious nearly all this time. Corporal Scully remained in this position throughout the night until, more than seven hours later, the rescue party were able to rescue him and the casualties.

When they first entered the house. Lieutenant Chittenden and Corporal Scully knew there was a grave risk of injury or death as the high walls nearby appeared about to collapse at any moment. Had this collapse occurred, they would have been buried under many tons of debris. Corporal Scully risked his life to save the two people and, though the position looked hopeless, Lieutenant Chittenden stayed with him.


Scully was the only member of the Pioneer Corps to be awarded the George Cross (although 13 George Medals and many other lesser awards have been won by Corps members.). No members of the Pioneer Corps have won the Victoria Cross while serving with the corps, although Francis George Miles served with the corps in World War II after winning the VC while serving with the Gloucestershire Regiment in World War I.

James Scully was the first Catholic recipient of a George Cross and is commemorated by a sculpture at Simpson Barracks. A Troop of the modern-day Royal Logistics Corps is also named after him.

Corporal Scully's medal group including the George Cross was sold at auction in London on 5 July 2011 for Ł72,000. The auction was held by Dix Noonan Webb and was lot number 705. It was sold with a quantity of original documentation, including the recipient's Soldier's Service and Pay Book; Buckingham Palace Coronation Medal 1953 certificate; membership certificate for the Royal Society of St George; two or three portrait photographs, and the cover feature of The Hornet of January 1967, featuring the recipient's G.C.-winning exploits.

James Scully died in 1974 while visiting his nephew, the English athlete and later sports broadcaster Brendan Foster.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Scully_(GC)
http://vconline.org.uk/james-p-scully-gc/4589482229
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Last edited by jembo; 20-01-2018 at 08:40 PM.
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